Monday, March 06, 2006

Escapism

Any of you who have reached the point of being able to read this post likely understand the benefits and pitfalls of escapism. You can't have been excessively fond of the practice because if you were, I can't imagine you'd be in a position to be reading this. Having said that, you may well be escaping something right now to be able to read this post. The important thing that you have likely figured out and I clearly have to work on is that escapism is a fine pass-time but it is no way to live in the long-term. It has to have an end to it. You can't escape forever. It is an inherently short-term thing. Granted, the longer it continues the harder it is to escape. I know, I know, escaping the escape. It has to happen though. I've been avoiding an assignment for my course so completely that I didn't even read the instructions, let alone complete the readings. Even though the assignment is already overdue and I made the unequivocal statement that I wouldn't sleep tonight until I had completed it I still managed to spend the whole evening trying to escape it. Rather short-sighted on my part knowing that I wouldn't be sleeping 'til it was done. Then again, finding ways to push yourself through these challenges prepares you for these and more complicated challenges in the future. Yeah. That's it. Alright, back to work.

4 Comments:

Blogger Nyx said...

mmm, i'm too familiar with this feeling... i often take work with me home at night, but almost always have to take it back the next morning - not finished. The thing is, I actually hate this lack of "strength-of-character", and can't understand why I keep doing it (or actually "not-doing-it".
So you see, you're not alone - hang in there.

5:00 AM  
Blogger James Fletcher Baxter said...

Consider:
The missing element in every human 'solution' is
an accurate definition of the creature.

The way we define 'human' determines our view
of self, others, relationships, institutions, life, and
future. Important? Only the Creator who made us
in His own image is qualified to define us accurately.
Choose wisely...there are results.

Many problems in human experience are the result of
false and inaccurate definitions of humankind premised
in man-made religions and humanistic philosophies.

Each individual human being possesses a unique, highly
developed, and sensitive perception of diversity. Thus
aware, man is endowed with a natural capability for enact-
ing internal mental and external physical selectivity.
Quantitative and qualitative choice-making thus lends
itself as the superior basis of an active intelligence.

Human is earth's Choicemaker. His title describes
his definitive and typifying characteristic. Recall
that his other features are but vehicles of experi-
ence intent on the development of perceptive
awareness and the following acts of decision and
choice. Note that the products of man cannot define
him for they are the fruit of the discerning choice-
making process and include the cognition of self,
the utility of experience, the development of value-
measuring systems and language, and the accultur-
ation of civilization.

The arts and the sciences of man, as with his habits,
customs, and traditions, are the creative harvest of
his perceptive and selective powers. Creativity, the
creative process, is a choice-making process. His
articles, constructs, and commodities, however
marvelous to behold, deserve neither awe nor idol-
atry, for man, not his contrivance, is earth's own
highest expression of the creative process.

Human is earth's Choicemaker. The sublime and
significant act of choosing is, itself, the Archimedean
fulcrum upon which man levers and redirects the
forces of cause and effect to an elected level of qual-
ity and diversity. Further, it orients him toward a
natural environmental opportunity, freedom, and
bestows earth's title, The Choicemaker, on his
singular and plural brow.

Let us proclaim it. Behold!
The Season of Generation-Choicemaker Joel 3:14 KJV

- from The HUMAN PARADIGM

3:52 AM  
Blogger Dr O2 said...

Is this race-related ;-) I guess we all do such things!!

How many sleepless nights should be spent until we learn we can do it in the day light ;-)

Very good point & well said Moji...

P.S: I'ld be glad to exchange linx with THE DREAMER.

3:07 AM  
Blogger Tamara said...

I'm beginning to consider that perhaps if I could really truly stop feeling GUILTY about my escapes... I would actually enjoy them... and who knows... maybe end up feeling completed motivated to do the things I have to do! Just a thought....

Hi! I'm Tamara :-)

3:41 AM  

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